IEC electoral system fell victim to vote rigging, says political expert

Mcebisi Ndletyana said an even more worrying factor in the IEC's electoral process was the fact that the commission’s additional security mechanism, such as the barcode scanner, could not prevent people from voting multiple times.

A citizen gets his thumb marked before casting his vote on 8 May 2019. Picture: GCIS

JOHANNESBURG - University of Johannesburg (UJ) associate professor of politics Mcebisi Ndletyana said the Electoral Commission of South Africa’s (IEC) electoral system had fallen victim to vote rigging.

He was commenting on the commission’s decision to launch an audit to investigate the extent of reported irregularities during Wednesday’s polls.

Ndletyana said an even more worrying factor in the IEC's electoral process was the fact that the commission’s additional security mechanism, such as the barcode scanner, could not prevent people from voting multiple times.

“That raises the possibility of inflating numbers for other parties, unfairly so. It’s rigging of elections.”

Meanwhile, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), which has been requested to help the IEC investigate the quality of the supposedly indelible ink, said it could complete its work by Saturday, 11 May.

The CSIR said it had been asked by the IEC to look into the ink that was used and whether the ink is soluble in soap.

The IEC has seven days, according to law, to declare the final election results.

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)