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This is the city where you’re most likely to be killed in SA - report

The 2018/2019 State of Urban Safety in South Africa Report looks at the state of crime, violence and safety in the country’s nine metros.

Picture: Supplied.

CAPE TOWN - You are more likely to be murdered in Cape Town, than any other city in South Africa.

This is one of the findings in the 2018/2019 State of Urban Safety in South Africa Report by the South African Cities Network.

The report looks at the state of crime, violence and safety in the country’s nine metros. It is a collation of data from sources like the South African Police Service and Stats SA.

According to the latest report, Cape Town has “very high rates of almost all crime types.”

The report revealed the city had the highest recorded rates of murder, robbery, and non-violent property-related crimes.

The murder rate has spiked by 60% since 2009/2010, and by 13% in the last year.

There were 69 reported murders per 100,000 Capetonians in 2017/2018, four times more than the city with the lowest murder rate, Tshwane.

Johannesburg recorded 31 murders per 100,000 during the same period, while Nelson Mandela Bay had the second highest rate at 54.

The report also showed Cape Town, like the other cities, had seen a decline in recorded cases of sexual offences.

High crime levels in cities are largely linked to the prevalence of guns, drugs and alcohol, according to the report.

The director of the University of Cape Town's safety and violence initiative Guy Lamb said the dramatic spike in murder rates in Cape Town since 2011 is connected to an influx of weapons into gang-infested areas.

“If you look at the Cape Town and the Nelson Mandela metropole, police are seizing more weapons. If the emphasis on collecting weapons continues in the near future, we should hopefully see reductions in the murder rate.”

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)

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