McBride details how police management delayed corruption probes

Robert McBride has taken the stand at the Zondo Commission of Inquiry, which has now turned to deal with capture within the criminal justice system.

A screengrab of Robert McBride giving testimony at the state capture commission on 11 April 2019. Picture: SABC/YouTube

JOHANNESBURG - Former head of the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (Ipid) Robert McBride has described how any attempt to investigate corruption at Crime Intelligence was frustrated by police management and classification was used to hide wrongdoing.

McBride has taken the stand at the Zondo Commission of Inquiry, which has now turned to deal with capture within the criminal justice system.

He was asked to explain how Crime Intelligence responded to Ipid’s investigations.

“Any request for information from Crime Intelligence, except for a brief period, is generally met with resistance. Very often Crime Intelligence will resort to the classification of documents in contravention of the policy of minimum security standards, which forbids the use of classification to cover-up maladministration or criminal conduct.”

MCBRIDE TESTIFIES ON 2015 SUSPENSION

McBride said he was suspended in 2015 as part of a widespread attack on anti-corruption bodies within the criminal justice system.

He told the commission his personal experience had led him to believe there had been an attack on anti-corruption institutions.

“My suspension was part of that process to take control of independent anti-corruption bodies and remove their heads and to replace them with people who wouldn’t carry out the task diligently.”

McBride said what he alleged was supported by evidence.

“Affidavits, dockets, and judgments all the way up to the Constitutional Court.”

He rejected suggestions he was testifying because he had an axe to grind.

'POLITICAL GANGSTERISM'

McBride has referred to the capture of law enforcement agencies as a silent coup and as political gangsterism.

He said the motivation to undermine law enforcement agencies was to ensure past crimes were covered up, and future crimes were not investigated.

“In order to succeed at what you are doing, you would need to capture the state and institutions of the state. At the time, we used the term silent coup or political gangsterism.”

He said there was a coordinated effort to make the Ipid dysfunctional after he was suspended in 2015.

“We had at least three, possibly four members of Crime Intelligence being appointed to Ipid and getting involved immediately with investigations.”

McBride said after his return, the Crime Intelligence members returned to their unit.

WATCH: Robert McBride at Zondo Commission