20°C / 22°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 27°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 27°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 24°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 22°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 18°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 27°C
  • 22°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 21°C
  • Fri
  • 24°C
  • 20°C
  • Sat
  • 26°C
  • 21°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 22°C
  • Mon
  • 27°C
  • 22°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 34°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 26°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 34°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 18°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 18°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 30°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 23°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 17°C

Experts: Up to 2% of learners in SA have rheumatic heart disease

The disease is caused by acute rheumatic fever, an illness brought on by an autoimmune response to a bacterial infection of the throat or skin.

Picture: Pixabay.com

NEWLANDS - Medical experts say up to 2% of school going children in South Africa have a form of rheumatic heart disease.

The disease is caused by acute rheumatic fever, an illness brought on by an autoimmune response to a bacterial infection of the throat or skin.

Funded by the Universities of Cape Town (UCT) and Manchester and the Children’s Heart Disease Research Unit, international clinicians are gathered in Cape Town to brainstorm ideas on how to better diagnose and treat the condition.

An inadequately treated sore throat, as a result of an infection caused by the streptococcus bacteria, can advance to acute rheumatic fever.

Rheumatic fever can cause permanent damage to the heart's valves leading to heart failure.

Welcoming medical specialists, UCT vice-chancellor Professor Mamokgethi Phakeng emphasised the university's commitment to assist in drastically reducing the prevalence of the disease.

“I want to encourage you to consider how your approach to heart disease in Africa can rely on African talent and make sure we keep it here.”

Experts including cardiologists from the United States, Uganda and New Zealand are brainstorming improved diagnostics and treatment regimes.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus