Saths Cooper ‘unaware’ of evidence showing Ramaphosa was a sellout

During the State of the Nation Address debate in February, Congress of the People leader Mosiuoa Lekota accused President Ramaphosa of being a sellout.

FILE: Saths Cooper. Picture: supplied.

CAPE TOWN - Anti-apartheid activist and prospective South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) board member Saths Cooper has said he is not aware of any evidence that shows President Cyril Ramaphosa sold out during the liberation struggle.

Cooper was one of the candidates interviewed by parliamentarians for a position on the SABC board o Thursday afternoon.

He faced questions from Members of Parliament (MPs) on a range of issues, including his knowledge of Ramaphosa’s arrest more than 30 years ago.

During the State of the Nation Address debate in February, Congress of the People leader Mosiuoa Lekota accused President Ramaphosa of being a sellout.

While Ramaphosa dismissed the allegations, the topic came up again during SABC board interviews with Cooper on the receiving end.

Cooper, who was also arrested along with Ramaphosa, had previously publicly dismissed Lekota’s claim that Ramaphosa was a sellout and repeated his stance on Thursday.

“Many of us wrote multiple statements and I clearly said I’m not aware of that allegation, as I still am not. I know the president was the chair of the [South African Student Organisation] (Saso) branch... it was banned on campus.”

Cooper said if Lekota or anyone has information to the contrary, they must provide it.

SABC PROBLEMS

Another SABC board candidate Rowan Nicholls said only SABC management can fix the problems at the struggling public broadcaster and not the board.

Nicholls, a registered accountant and auditor who hails from Queenstown in the Eastern Cape, was one of the candidates to come before the communications committee.

The committee is concluding its interviews of 24 candidates to fill eight vacancies on the board.

“You, in fact, need to get the people to deliver to you so you can undertake that responsibility. Too many people in South Africa think board members, auditors or lawyers can fix a problem. The answer is management fixes it.”

The committee, once it concludes its interviews, will select its preferred candidates to serve on the board.

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)