Some SABC employees receive salaries after bank glitch causes outcry

The public broadcaster failed to pay salaries on time on Tuesday morning, blaming a technical glitch on the banks' side.

FILE: The SABC headquarters in Auckland Park. Picture: SABC.

JOHANNESBURG - Eyewitness News has learned that some South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) employees have now received their salary.

The SABC said in a statement: “The SABC reported earlier this morning that its employees had not been paid their salaries as expected, due to a technical error experienced by the financial institution. The SABC would like to advise that the financial institution has resolved the technical error and salaries are being paid.

“The corporation would like to thank its employees for their patience, support and apologise for any inconvenience caused, whilst the SABC was addressing the matter with the financial institution.”

The public broadcaster failed to pay salaries on time on Tuesday morning, blaming a technical glitch on the bank's side.

There have been concerns about the financial crisis at the public broadcaster with a warning last year already that its funds will run out which will impact salaries if something is not done urgently.

Frustrated employees contacted EWN in a panic on Tuesday, complaining that they were not warned in advance.

This frenzy was partly triggered by concerns raised in Parliament by the SABC management painting a bleak picture of not being able to pay salaries in the future if the financial crisis at the public broadcaster doesn't change.

The broadcaster's Neo Momodu said that there was a technical problem on the bank's side and had assured staff that they will be paid before the end of the day.

Meanwhile, the Communication Workers Unions (CWU) has criticised the SABC for not communicating to employees when it first picked up that there was a technical glitch which delayed the payout of salaries.

CWU secretary general Aubrey Tshabalala said: “We think that they should be telling the truth because if that’s not the case, then we have to hold them accountable. Some people might experience debit order rejections and there’s penalty fees from banking institutions. Those are the things we are going to look at.”

(Edited by Mihlali Ntsabo)