20°C / 22°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 24°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 26°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 24°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 24°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 25°C
  • 19°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 28°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 19°C
  • Sat
  • 28°C
  • 22°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 22°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 20°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 23°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 31°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 27°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 25°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 34°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 36°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 14°C

Study: Workers on new minimum wage spend 33% of earnings on basic food

On 1 January, the new national minimum wage of R20 an hour kicked in. On average, this amounts to a net salary of R3,460 a month.

Groceries. Picture: EWN

JOHANNESBURG - A significant portion of the money earned by workers on the new minimum wage is spent on basic food items every month.

This is according to a new study that examines how much minimum wage workers around the world spend on food, by Picodi.

The study examines whether a country's minimum wage is high enough to allow workers to meet the basic nutritional needs.

On 1 January, the new national minimum wage of R20 an hour kicked in. On average, this amounts to a net salary of R3,460 a month.

To conduct the study, eight universal food groups were looked at: bread, milk, rice, eggs, cheese, meat, fruits and vegetables, which meet the nutritional needs of an adult.

In South Africa, for a basket filled with basic items from the list above, you will have to pay around R1,159.15.

Contents of the shopping basket and the average prices:

  • Milk (10l) — R136.20

  • Bread (10 loaves, 500g each) — R125.60

  • Rice (2.5kg) — R30.29

  • Eggs (20) — R44.53

  • Cheese (1kg) — R96.50

  • Poultry and beef (6kg) — R482.01

  • Fruits (6kg) — R116.20

  • Vegetables (8kg) — R127.82

Considering the average prices of food in South Africa, expenditure on basic food products makes 33.5% of the minimum wage, which places South Africa 36th on the list of 52 countries examined.

The Philippines and Nigeria are in the worst situation, though. The minimum wage in Nigeria is so low that it doesn’t cover the costs of even the most basic shopping basket.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus