ANC WC says supports planned sit-in at Clifton beach

The Western Cape African National Congress (ANC) is supporting the planned sit-in on the beach to protest action by a private security company.

Clifton Beach in Cape Town. Picture: Cindy Archillies/EWN.

CAPE TOWN – Clifton 4th beach will again become the scene of a protest this evening.

The Western Cape African National Congress (ANC) is supporting the planned sit-in on the beach to protest action by a private security company.

It emerged the company Professional Protection Alternatives (PPA) has been clearing the beaches after dark.

The company has no mandate to do so from the city.

This afternoon the people who first brought the issue of PPA's actions to light will hold their own protest picnic on Clifton fourth.

The Western Cape ANC is supporting the picnic, it's spokesperson Dennis Cruywagen says, “It will be a peaceful picnic, that’s the intention to peacefully make the point that the beach belongs to all Capetonians.”

On Friday, a lobby group called the Black People's National Crisis Committee slaughtered a sheep on the beach.

Members told Eyewitness News the action was aimed at reclaiming the space.

Their protest came shortly after a visit by the deputy Police Minister who decried the security company's actions as racial profiling.

Cape Town Mayor Dan Plato has rejected this narrative, saying the company cleared people of all races off the beach and reiterating the fact that it was in the wrong to do so.

Earlier, the party rejected claims that it's using a row over beaches as a political football.

A member of the party was among those asked to leave Clifton 4th Beach in Cape Town by a private security company on Sunday.

Cruywagen said the incident that sparked the outrage was not staged.

“There have been some allegations that people have been deliberately trying to provoke a confrontation for political ends, that’s not true. They went there to celebrate an annual event, and in any case, any beach in South Africa should be open to any citizen of this country.”

Deputy Police Minister Bongani Mkongi has decried the incident as racial profiling.

“In 1989, we had a defiance campaign [and] I was a small boy. We were entering here as part of our defiance campaign. People were swimming here with their dogs, but they didn’t want to allow us as black people to enter this particular beach. So, you can’t do the same down the line in a democratic South Africa.”