ANC NEC to decide fate of Hlongwa, Mahlangu

The Gauteng PEC’s decision not to support the commission’s recommendations regarding the membership of disgraced former Health MEC’s Brian Hlongwa and Qedani Mahlangu.

FILE: Former Gauteng Health MEC Qedani Mahlangu gives testimony at the Life Esidimeni arbitration hearing in Johannesburg on 22 January 2018. Picture: Sethembiso Zulu/EWN

JOHANNESBURG – The African National Congress (ANC) in Gauteng says the party’s Integrity Commission has no jurisdiction on revoking anyone's membership, saying that is the work of the disciplinary committee.

This follows the provincial executive committee's (PEC) decision not to support the commission’s recommendations regarding the membership of disgraced former Health MECs Brian Hlongwa and Qedani Mahlangu.

A report by the Special Investigations Unit earlier this year implicated Hlongwa in corrupt and fraudulent dealings worth R1.2 billion during his tenure.

Mahlangu, on the other hand, has been placed at the centre of the Esidimeni tragedy where 144 mentally ill patients died after being illegally transferred.

The ANC, however, says it agrees with the commission that both Mahlangu and Hlongwa should not hold public office.

ANC national executive committee (NEC) is now expected to decide on the fate of those who the Integrity Commission has recommended they step aside from their positions.

Hlongwa has resigned from his post as ANC chief whip in the Gauteng Legislature on Monday.

Questions are now being raised about Hlongwa and Mahlangu’s continued stay on the PEC, with the NEC expected to make a recommendation regarding that matter when it sits over the weekend.

At the same time, the NEC is also expected to talk about the VBS implicated officials Limpopo deputy chair Florence Radzilani and treasurer Danny Msiza.

The Great Bank Heist report fingers them in the looting of the bank, together with 51 other parties, collectively benefiting almost R2 billion.

The Integrity Commission has recommended that the pair step aside from their roles while they try to clear their names in the courts.