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[LISTEN] Ayanda Mabulu on graphic sexual & extremist political themes in his art

| Radio 702 and CapeTalk's Eusebius McKaiser hosts a debate between the Nelson Mandela Foundation's Sello Hatang and Mabulu about his depiction of Madiba as emblematic of Nazism.

JOHANNESBURG - Why does Ayanda Mabulu use the shocking themes he has become known for in his paintings of South African politicians, including the late Nelson Mandela?

Talk Radio 702 and CapeTalk's Eusebius McKaiser hosts a debate between the Nelson Mandela Foundation's Sello Hatang and Mabulu about his depiction of Madiba as emblematic of Nazism.

"The symbol of hatred being associated with Madiba is something that I thought... is a touch too far," Hatang says.

McKaiser challenges Mabulu on making comparisons between a fascist government - that of Adolf Hitler- and a democratic one - the African National Congress (ANC) - which has its failures.

When invited to chat with Hatang over coffee, Mabulu rejects the invite, saying his coffee will be poisoned with rat poison.

"This man is being paid by Mandela Foundation... He is sitting there representing something of a huge failure, but because he is fattening his pocket every month end and is too much of a... better black wannabe..."

Listen to the audio above for more.

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