Land hearings: ‘Amending Constitution won’t solve SA’s problems’

Parliament’s constitutional review committee is hosting the second and last phase of its hearings process.

FILE: AgriSA officials addressing MPs during public hearings on land reform at Parliament. Picture: @ParliamentofRSA/Twitter.

CAPE TOWN - Day two of public hearings on land reform has resumed at Parliament.

Parliament’s constitutional review committee is hosting the second and last phase of its hearings process, where those who made written submissions have the opportunity to make oral presentations before parliamentarians.

AgriSA believes there’s no need for constitutional change to allow for land expropriation without compensation.

The state should rather focus on strengthening the implementation of existing land policies and initiatives, it adds.

AgriSA deputy executive director Christo van der Rheede said: “No change is necessary. What needs to be changed is the entire bureaucratic system, the current land reform policies and programmes.”

Annelize Crosby, AgriSA’s head of the Centre of Excellence on Land, says they aren’t opposed to expropriation, but with compensation.

“Basically, almost all countries pay compensation. But the standard for compensation does differ.”

The organisation says changing Section 25 of the Constitution won’t solve the country’s problems and could instead cause a host of other challenges.

WATCH: Parliament hearings on changing Section 25 of the Constitution - Day 2

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)