Winter rains bring much-needed respite to Cape Town’s dams

The national department of Water and Sanitation says the dam level is currently at 29% which is about 139 million cubic meters of water.

EWN visited the Theewaterskloof Dam on 22 June 2018. Picture: Cindy Archillies/EWN

CAPE TOWN – The much-needed winter rains have arrived in Cape Town and the province's biggest dam, Theewaterskloof, has seen a significant increase in water levels compared with last year.

The national Department of Water and Sanitation says the dam level is currently at 29% which is about 139 million cubic meters of water.

This time last year, the dam was at 17%.

A few months ago, at the end of summer, Theewaterskloof dam was almost completely dry, due to the prolonged drought. Instead of water, it was filled with sand and dead trees.

In February, the dam level was at 11.5% and authorities were forced to drill into the dam to extract the last 10% of its water.

Now things have changed.

For the first time in months, the collective level of Western Cape dams has risen to above 30%.

This week, water flowed through Theewaterskloof, the biggest dam in the region. A few months ago, it was mostly sand.

But Cape Town is not out of the woods yet.

The department says it will take up to four seasons of normal winter rainfall for dam levels to recover.

WATCH: Western Cape dam levels rise to above 30%