Murder accused Henri van Breda to learn his fate

Van Breda stands accused of killing his parents and older brother, and maiming his younger sister in an attack at their Stellenbosch home in January 2015.

FILE: Triple murder accused, Henri van Breda, made a brief appearance in the Western Cape High Court on 27 March 2018. Picture: Cindy Archillies/EWN

CAPE TOWN – It's been three years since the Van Breda family murder and on Monday the case against accused Henri van Breda will finally conclude in the Western Cape High Court.

Van Breda stands accused of killing his parents and older brother, and maiming his younger sister in an attack at their Stellenbosch home in January 2015.

Judge Siraj Desai is expected to deliver judgment in the matter on Monday morning.

WATCH: Henri Van Breda: What to know before judgment day

The case against Van Breda has been a stop-start affair and over months that it has been before the courts. Several key aspects have emerged.

Forensic evidence will be a key deciding factor. Prosecutor Susan Galloway argued there was not enough forensic evidence to prove an intruder had been at the house, while the defence attempted to attack the credibility of the State's DNA evidence.

The security at the complex also played a significant role, as Van Breda claimed that at least two intruders had managed to break into the family's home. The State argued that the security was watertight, but the defence poked holes in that argument, citing the ease of access over the perimeter wall.

The defence also argued that the State failed to prove Van Breda had any motive to attack his family, with various witnesses testifying to the family's close bond.

The State raised questions about how Van Breda acted that night, questioning his alleged blackout and fight with the axe-wielding attacker. The defence led evidence that he suffers from a condition that's relatively rare in adults called juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This, the defence claims, could be the reason for Van Breda's “blackout” that night.

The judgment will bring to an end three years of intense media coverage and two years of stop-start court proceedings.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)