Numsa: Bus strike negotiations have been difficult

General secretary Irvin says it would be to the detriment of their own companies should employers decide to revert to previous offers.

FILE: Satawu, Numsa, Tawusa and Towu leaders met to discuss the nationwide bus strike. Picture: Katleho Sekhotho/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - Unions involved in the bus strike say it’s important that employers negotiate in good faith until a complete resolution is found.

On Friday unions announced that the strike would continue until a solution was reached regarding the back-pay of employees for the month of April when the strike began.

On the table sits an agreeable offer for unions, with a 9% pay rise for the first year and 8% for the second year. Other issues relating to the payment of night shift allowance, dual drivers and insourcing have been handed to a task team.

Speaking at a briefing on Friday, Numsa general secretary Irvin Jim says so far it’s been difficult to negotiate with employers.

“It is basically gambling with the lives of the working class who are directly and negatively affected by this strike. They don’t care because it is our black and African communities who have no reliable public transport to go and come from work. We are saying this strike must come to an end.”

Jim says it would be to the detriment of their own companies should employers decide to revert to previous offers.

“These workers are going nowhere. We are united as unions and are going to be strong. If employers are going to show that attitude, it will also mean that we must plan for how we will be spiteful for them next year.

“The bottom line is we have not taken this strike during Easter like we did last year because we feel for our community.”