CCMA anticipates increased caseload with new labour laws

CCMA Director Cameron Morajane says the new labour laws will present serious resource challenges for the council which currently handles almost 200,000 cases a year.

The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) branch in Cape Town. Picture: Google maps

CAPE TOWN - The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) says it expects the introduction of new labour laws to introduce a basic minimum wage and conditions of employment will significantly increase its caseload.

It says the new laws will impact on available resources to ensure compliance.

CCMA Director Cameron Morajane made a submission to Parliament on Thursday as part of public hearings on the proposed new labour laws.

The hearings are set to continue on Friday, as Parliament chases a deadline to ensure a minimum wage is introduced by 1 May.

Morajane says the new labour laws will present serious resource challenges for the council which currently handles almost 200,000 cases a year.

“It’s anticipated that the implementation of these amendments on collective bargaining, minimum wage and basic conditions will definitely have a significant impact on the CCMA operations.”

Think Tank the Institute for Economic Justice meanwhile says the proposed bills are not in line with what was agreed at Nedlac, and a draft bill was also not presented to the council for discussion.

The institute’s Neil Coleman says there was no consultation on phasing out sectoral determinations which dictate the minimum wage in several sectors.

“Equally worrying, the bills are incoherent in many important respects.”

President Cyril Ramaphosa has promised the minimum wage will be introduced by May, but with Parliament going on recess next week, it appears extremely unlikely that this deadline will be met.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)