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‘We can’t give up fight for land and housing’

Daphne Erosi, who lives in Khayelitsha’s Site B and an Equal Education activist, says overcrowding is resulting in the loss of lives.

FILE: Scores of people gathered in Kaizergracht Street, Cape Town ahead of a march for land, housing and school safety on 21 March 2018. Picture: Lauren Isaacs/EWN.

CAPE TOWN - A Khayelitsha resident says people living in Cape Town’s informal settlements cannot afford to back down in their fight for land and housing.

Daphne Erosi joined scores of demonstrators on Human Rights Day to march for land, housing and school safety.

Several civil society groups, including Equal Education, the Social Justice Coalition and Reclaim the City, were part of the demonstration.

Erosi, who lives in Khayelitsha’s Site B and an Equal Education activist, says overcrowding is resulting in the loss of lives.

She says due to a lack of space, shacks are built close to each other leaving no space for emergency vehicles.

“When ambulances or police vans come to the aid of the members of the community they are restricted because there are no roads. The problem is people are being murdered, raped and houses ransacked while police struggle to reach them.”

WATCH: Activists march for land in Cape Town

Meanwhile, a group of elderly Capetonians, who left District Six during the apartheid era’s forced removals, says that their dying wish is to move back to their place of birth.

A man born in District Six in the early 1950s says he had been forced to move to Athlone along with his family during the apartheid regime’s forced removals in the early 1970s.

He says that younger generations who are less deserving of moving into District Six are getting accommodation there.

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)

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