Daughter of Nyakane Tsolo says father would have been proud of SA youth

Nyakane Tsolo is one of 69 people who were killed when the apartheid police opened fire on an unarmed crowd in Sharpeville in 1960.

Nyakane Tsolo led the march against pass laws in Sharpeville in 1960. Picture: Screengrab

JOHANNESBURG - As South Africa commemorates Human Rights Day on Wednesday the daughter of the man who led the march against pass laws in Sharpeville says that while it’s a sad day for her family, her father would’ve been proud of how the youth have fought for issues, including free education.

Nyakane Tsolo is one of 69 people who were killed when the apartheid police opened fire on an unarmed crowd in the Vereeniging township in 1960.

Tsolo's daughter Julia says her family is at her father's grave on Wednesday morning laying a wreath.

“Today is a very sad day for us as a family because we certainly commemorate, so it’s not a celebration. We are very proud, and I know my father would have been extremely proud to see the kind of development that the youth are raising. The youth are raising issues that affect themselves, affecting the poor.”

Meanwhile, historian Thandolwethu Sipuye says he’s disappointed that Tsolo is not recognised as a hero among people such as Robert Sobukwe and Nelson Mandela.

“Nyakane Tsolo is the man who led the Sharpeville protest and he is unknown, completely erased from our national narrative and the memory around human rights. He’s never been mentioned, he’s never honoured, there are no monuments, he’s nowhere in the curriculum.”