CRL Commission: No law to protect South Africans from ‘abusive’ churches

Three of the brothers, referred to as angels, were arrested and other church members fatally shot by police after they were linked to the Ngcobo police murders.

Some of those living at the Mancoba Seven Angels Ministries Church being returned to their homes on 28 February 2018. Picture: Bertram Malgas/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural‚ Religious‚ and Linguistic Communities (CRL Rights Commission) says there’s nothing in the law that stops the four remaining brothers of the Mancoba Seven Angels Ministry from relocating their church and operating it elsewhere.

Three of the brothers, referred to as angels, were arrested and other church members fatally shot by police after they were linked to the Ngcobo police murders.

Five police officers and a former soldier were killed during an attack on the police station last week.

The church is accused of harbouring murderers, refusing to let children attend school and brainwashing congregants.

The CRL Rights Commission’s Thoko Mkhwanazi Xaluva says that contrary to Parliament’s sentiments on regulating the religious sector, there’s nothing in the law that stops people from starting churches that abuse people’s rights.

“There must be a legal framework that governs self-regulation, and self-regulation will go together with a code of conduct.”

Mkhwanazi Xaluva says the commission is going to approach the Constitutional Court for a declaratory order on the matter.

She says in the meantime, people are encouraged to report cult churches in the communities to the commission.

WATCH: Members of the Mancoba Seven Angels Ministry return home