'Ngcobo attack shows lack of laws governing religious sector'

The CRL Commission’s Thoko Mkhwanazi Xaluva says they noted issues around the Ngcobo-based church two years ago when they interviewed the church leaders, known as angels.

CRL Commission chair Thoko Mkhwanazi Xaluva. Picture: Thando Kubheka/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) says the recent developments at the Seven Angels Ministries in the Eastern Cape are proof that there aren’t enough laws governing the religious sector.

The Ngcobo church, which has now been branded a cult is accused of harbouring murderers, cutting congregants off from society and brainwashing them.

Seven men were killed at the church last week and 10 more arrested during a raid on the premises in search of a group of cop killers.

Five police officers and a former soldier were killed during an attack on the Ncgobo police station last week.

The CRL Commission’s Thoko Mkhwanazi Xaluva says they noted issues around the Ngcobo-based church two years ago when they interviewed the church leaders, known as angels.

“When you hear that you know at some point money is going to run dry here. And when money runs dry, it’s going to be problematic.”

Mkhwanazi-Xaluva says the commission then sent a report to Parliament but were informed that there were enough laws to oversee the religious sector.

“But you can’t arrest them when people say there are enough laws to deal with these things. Which laws were supposed to apply in Ngcobo at that particular time before they went to the police station?”

She says the Eastern Cape church is a godsend incident to show that there’s a need for regulation in the religious sector.