Water crisis: City of CT to ensure economy stays afloat

There are a number of measures in the pipeline to try and prevent Cape Town from running out of water.

The V&A Waterfront seen in Cape Town. Picture: freeimages.com

CAPE TOWN – As some call for the deputy president to intervene in relief efforts, moves to save Cape Town from a disaster appear to be gathering momentum.

There are a number of measures in the pipeline to try and prevent Cape Town from running out of water.

Apart from avoiding the taps from running dry for ordinary Capetonians, the City of Cape Town’s Xanthea Limberg says their efforts are also focused on ensuring that the domestic economy still functions.

“We will still keep critical points alive on the water reticulation system, such as hospitals, clinics, informal settlements, and key business and industrial nodes.”

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Regarding the much-vaunted water augmentation projects, like desalination plants, she vows they will come online in the next two months.

“The Strandfontein plant will start bringing water online from end of February, while Monwabisi and the V&A will bring water from March.”

Democratic Alliance leader Mmusi Maimane will on Tuesday afternoon give an update on interventions to stave off Day Zero.

MJC'S PLEA

The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) has called on the Cape Town Muslim community to use water sparingly when they perform ablution before the five mandatory daily prayers.

In Islam, Muslims make 'wudhu', which is a mandatory ablution performed before prayer.

In circumstances where water can't be found anywhere within a certain radius, dry ablution can be made using purified sand or dust.

The call comes as the Cape continues to battle a water crisis that has been brought on by a drought.

The city will implement level 6b water restrictions on Thursday that will limit water usage to 50 litres per person per day.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)