Concerns raised about CT school operations when taps run dry

There's still no word from the Presidency on whether the Western Cape premier's request for Cape Town's water crisis to be declared a national disaster is under consideration.

Picture: EWN

CAPE TOWN - There's still no word from the Presidency on whether the Western Cape premier's request for Cape Town's water crisis to be declared a national disaster is under consideration.

Helen Zille recently wrote to President Jacob Zuma asking for the national government to further prioritise the issue.

The taps will run dry sooner than expected, with Day Zero now moved nine days forward to 12 April.

Meanwhile, water researcher Anthony Turton, says that with the crisis come many serious concerns, including how schools will manage.

"I cannot see how schools continue to function because I've worked with different schools in Gauteng that faced a significant water crisis about two years ago with that big drought and kids were becoming dehydrated. What if a building catches alight?"

Zille is soon to meet with principals in parts of Cape Town as well as education officials from the Drakenstein, Stellenbosch and West Coast municpalities to discuss how the water shortage will affect them.

Her office says that plans are being finalised for schools that require additional support to secure their water supply.