Public concern over state capture led to inquiry decision, says Zuma

After months of court battles, the president announced his decision on Tuesday night, saying that the matter of appointing a commission of inquiry into state capture deserves urgent attention.

President Jacob Zuma. Picture: GCIS

JOHANNESBURG - President Jacob Zuma says that his consideration of the public's concern over the issue of state capture is what finally led him to comply with the Public Protector's remedial action.

After months of court battles, the president announced his decision on Tuesday night, saying that the matter of appointing a commission of inquiry into state capture deserves urgent attention.

He says he was concerned that a further delay in the matter would make the public doubt government's commitment to fighting corruption.

The president has been accused of allowing the controversial Gupta family to covertly take over government reigns.

Zuma has finally agreed to appointing a commission of inquiry into state capture on the eve of the first meeting of the newly appointed African National Congress national executive committee (NEC), a move that many have described as a strategic attempt to try and influence the NEC not to recall him.

However, the president insists that the decision was based on efforts to root out corruption.

“That any further delay will make the public doubt government’s determination to dismantle all forms of corruption and entrench the public perception that the state has been captured by private interests.”

He says deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo will head the commission as selected by Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng.