DA suspends De Lille from party activities

Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille has been asked to provide reasons to the Democratic Alliance (DA) why she should not resign as mayor.

FILE: Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille. Photo: Bertram Malgas/EWN

CAPE TOWN - Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille has been asked to provide reasons to the Democratic Alliance (DA) why she should not resign as mayor.

This following an investigation by a DA sub-committee into allegations of maladministration in the city and tensions within its city caucus.

The DA says that the probe has now been concluded and there’s sufficient cause for concern over De Lille’s leadership.

De Lille and mayoral committee member JP Smith were placed on suspension in October after differences over the closure of a special investigating unit became a public spat.

The DA says its sub-committee tasked with investigating tensions within its city caucus has found sufficient management and governance-related challenges that are negatively affecting the running of the city.

Spokesperson Phumzile Van Damme: "A sub-committee was set up by the federal executive chaired by John Steenhuisen that sub-committee has now completed its work and tabled its report to the federal executive. Based on the content of that report, the federal executive is of the opinion that the mayor of Cape Town needed to be suspended from party activities."

The party’s federal executive has now asked Patricia de Lille to defend her position as mayor.

The DA says that to ensure the efficient running of the city, it is imperative that it gets to the bottom of the allegations levelled against her, and if necessary make swift leadership changes.

Federal executive chairperson James Selfe says that for now De Lille and Smith remain suspended and no further action has been taken against them.

"Until the matter has been completely settled, it is desirable for the protagonists not to be stirring up emotions on either side."

Selfe says the matter will be discussed further at the next meeting of the federal executive next week.