CRL Commission, stakeholders discuss corporal punishment at home ruling

The Commission says the ruling makes it difficult for parents to discipline children in a society already plagued by problems such as youth drug and alcohol abuse.

Stop child abuse. Picture: Louise McAuliffe/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The CRL Rights Commission has met with various stakeholders to discuss the High Court ruling that corporal punishment at home is illegal and unconstitutional and the implications it has on parenting.

The commission says the ruling makes it difficult for parents to discipline children in a society already plagued by problems such as youth drug and alcohol abuse.

In October, the court ruled that punishment of a child is illegal and unconstitutional, meaning parents who hit their children could be charged with assault.

CRL chairperson Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva says alternative measures may not be enough.

“Alternatives that are on the table right now will include, for instance, sending the child to their room, take away the toys and play stations and cellphones. Those things don’t work if you’re living in a poor environment.”