‘Highly unlikely that Van Breda faked amnesia after axe murders’

Doctor James Butler diagnosed Henri Van Breda with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy after a seizure earlier in November.

A screengrab shows Dr James Butler at the Western Cape High Court on 27 November 2017 during Henri Van Breda's trial. Picture: News24/youtube.com

CAPE TOWN - A neurologist says it’s highly unlikely Henri van Breda would have been able to fake amnesia shortly after the family axe murder he’s accused of.

Doctor James Butler has continued delivering testimony in the Western Cape High Court on Tuesday, saying there is scientific evidence the 23-year-old accused experienced seizures.

Van Breda is accused of the murder of his parents and older brother and the attempted murder of his younger sister in their Stellenbosch home in January 2015.

Butler diagnosed Van Breda with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy after a seizure earlier in November.

On Tuesday, Butler mapped out symptoms of postictal delirium, which is the altered state of consciousness following an epileptic seizure.

Butler says if the brain is not functioning well, it’s highly unlikely a sufferer would be able to concoct a fabrication of the truth.

He adds this can also be linked to the accused’s lack of urgency when he phoned emergency services following the attack.

State prosecutor Susan Galloway has begun with cross-examination.

WATCH: Van Breda murder trial: Neurologists continues testimony courtesy of News24

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)