Who is in charge of Zim?

The resignation letter of Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe doesn't mention who he leaves in charge.

A protester carries a placard calling for President Robert Mugabe to relinquish power during a protest march in Harare on 18 November 2017. Picture: EWN

HARARE - The resignation letter written by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe that was read out by the speaker of the country's parliament made no mention of who he was leaving in charge of the country.

The speaker added that he was working on legal issues to make sure a new leader was in place by the end of Wednesday.

Earlier on Tuesday Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe's president a week after the army and his former political allies moved against him, ending four decades of rule by a man who turned from independence hero to archetypal African strongman.

The 93-year-old had clung on for a week after an army takeover and expulsion from his own ruling ZANU-PF party, but resigned shortly after parliament began an impeachment process seen as the only legal way to force him out._

Wild celebrations broke out at a joint sitting of parliament when Speaker Jacob Mudenda announced Mugabe's resignation and suspended the impeachment procedure.

Mugabe is the only leader Zimbabwe has known since a guerrilla struggle ended white-minority rule in the former Rhodesia.

During his reign, he took the once-rich country to economic ruin and kept his grip on power through repression of opponents, although he styled himself as the Grand Man of African politics and kept the admiration of many people across Africa.

The army seized power after Mugabe sacked Emmerson Mnangagwa, ZANU-PF's favourite to succeed him, to smooth a path to the presidency for his wife Grace, 52, known to her critics as "Gucci Grace" for her reputed fondness for luxury shopping.

But Mugabe refused to resign, prompting the impeachment procedure which would have been the only legal was to force him out.

Mnangagwa, whose whereabouts are unknown after fleeing the country in fear for his safety, is expected to take over as president.

At the same time, Zimbabwe’s former vice president Mnangagwa will be sworn in as president on Wednesday or Thursday, ZANU-PF legal secretary Patrick Chinamasa told Reuters, after the resignation of Robert Mugabe.

Separately, ZANU-PF chief whip Lovemore Matuke told Reuters that Mnangagwa would be sworn in within 48 hours and that he would serve the remainder of Mugabe’s term until the next general elections, which must be held by September 2018.

Zanu-PF Chief Whip reportedly said Mnangagwa "will be in office within 48 hours" and serve the rest of Mugabe's term until elections in 2018.