Lesufi: SA can’t afford single language schools

Gauteng Education MEC Panyaza Lesufi has urged members of the public to participate in the recently published Education Amendment Bill.

FILE: Gauteng MEC for Education Panyaza Lesufi. Picture: Sethembiso Zulu/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - Gauteng Education MEC Panyaza Lesufi has urged members of the public to participate in the recently published Education Amendment Bill.

Lesufi says public input is important especially concerning the rejection of single language schools and the review of the administration of admissions in public schools.

He says the recently proposed amendments seek to find a quality, equitable and inclusive basic education system.

Lesufi says organisations opposing the introduction of additional languages in the educational system affirms that languages continue to be undermined.

“There is no way, no way that the education of our own people can be compromised clearly because some people want to preserve their privileges.”

He has urged Minister Angie Motshekga to ignore such calls.

“We urge the minister not to be intimidated or to withdraw an inch of this amendment. We’ll defend this amend to the bitter end.”

Lesufi says the country cannot afford a single language school when the demand for education is so huge.

The powers of school governing bodies are also addressed in the Amendment Bill.

ADMISSIONS OF PUPILS

Lesufi says the administration of admissions of pupils in schools is a serious concern.

He says numerous parents have raised their displeasure on how school governing bodies are undermining their Constitutional right to education, and believe the proposed Education Amendment Bill, which seeks to relook the powers of the SGB, could help deal with the challenge.

Lesufi says SGBs and some school management teams misappropriate public resources and charge sky-scraping school fees to impede access to quality education, hence these amendments.

“We’re also urging our people to make representations about the need for professional people to be appointed, so that we can have good principals in our communities.”