Casac: Little public faith in state institutions acting against corruption

Investigative journalist Jacques Pauw has questioned how the State Security Agency has been spending its multi-million-rand budget and whether South Africans are getting any value from it.

Picture: EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The Council for the Advancement of the South African Constitution (Casac) says there’s very little public faith in state institutions taking action against corrupt practices in light of new allegations about the State Security Agency irregularly spending billions of rand.

Investigative journalist Jacques Pauw has questioned how the State Security Agency has been spending its multi-million-rand budget and whether South Africans are getting any value from it.

Pauw’s new book The President’s Keepers contains allegations against President Jacob Zuma relating to corruption and irregularities with his tax affairs.

He also highlighted that South Africans are not allowed to know what operations the agency spends its money on.

Casac's Lawson Naidoo says these funds need to be accounted for.

“Jacques Pauw details how the intelligence service was set up with huge budget that have gone totally unaccounted for. These are issues which ought to be handled by the Inspector-General for Intelligence and Parliament's joint committee on intelligence.

“But as I said, given the climate that we’re in, those institutions have been compromised. I think there’s very little public faith in that process.”

WATCH: Eusebius McKaiser in conversation with Jacques Pauw

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Posted by 702 on Tuesday, 7 November 2017

The State Security Agency and South African Revenue Service have threatened to take legal action against Pauw, saying that there's been a violation of statutory provisions.

But Pauw and his publishers are not concerned about going to court over his new book.

Pauw's lawyers have responded to the State Security Agency's cease and desist letter, saying the information in the book is credible and of undeniable public interest.

Pauw has continued to call out authorities like the agency and says billions of taxpayers’ money has been spent irregularly.

“We are not allowed to know what state security spend on their projects.”

The agency's Director-General Arthur Fraser and his family, meanwhile, are seeking legal advice. The family says that Pauw has unjustly accused them of criminal activity.

But Pauw insists that there's massive fraud and corruption involving the Frasers, and an intelligence operation dubbed "Pan", costing over R1 billion.

(Edited by Leeto M Khoza)