State: Henri Van Breda's memory loss selective

The prosecution argues that blood spatter evidence and the crime scene do not match his version of events.

Triple murder accused Henri van Breda in the Western Cape High Court on 2 November 2017. Picture: Cindy Archillies/EWN

CAPE TOWN - Murder accused Henri van Breda on Monday concluded giving evidence.

It follows days of often gruelling cross-examination.

The prosecution argues that blood spatter evidence and the crime scene do not match his version of events.

Prosecutor Susan Galloway has ended her cross-examination by arguing that the accused only ever lost his memory at times when it suited him.

Galloway says these "selective memory loss" instances arose at the most incriminating parts of the State's case.

The prosecutor has questioned why his testimony in court differed from his police statement.

The accused has told the court that he heard gurgling sounds coming from his brother, who was moving around violently, but in the police statement he doesn't mention this.

Van Breda says that the police statement contained inaccuracies, and was not written verbatim.

The defence will do re-examination on Tuesday.

Yesterday, the State questioned why the accused didn't console his wounded relatives after they were attacked with an axe.

The State prosecutor has also questioned why Van Breda tried to call his former girlfriend, Bianca van Der Westhuizen, several times that night while attempting to get through to emergency services.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)