State argues Van Breda has selective memory loss

The state has ended its cross-examination by arguing the instances of selective memory loss from Henri van Breda's have only occurred during the more incriminating parts of the state's case.

The State prosecutor concluded her cross-examination of Henri van Breda in the Western Cape High Court. Picture: Cindy Archillies/EWN

CAPE TOWN - The State has argued family axe murder accused Henri van Breda has selective memory loss.

Van Breda has told the court there are several incorrect statements in his police statement that officers took down on the 27 January 2015.

The State has questioned inconsistencies in Van Breda's testimony compared to the statement, arguing he's changed details and timelines to suit his case.

Prosecutor Susan Galloway has ended her cross-examination by arguing the instances of selective memory loss from Henri van Breda's side have only occurred during the more incriminating parts of the state's case.

Van Breda has denied he's being vague where he sees it to be to his advantage.

“You suggested earlier that I was being vague about when I got the bump on my head so that I could say that it could have happened on the way down the stairs or the way back. But that doesn’t help me if, I were to say that is sustained the injury on my head after losing consciousness, that would be in line with the Dr's evidence.”

Galloway says the blood spatter evidence and the state of the crime scene do not support van Breda's version of events.

She argues he had ample time to come up with an explanation in response to the State's case against him.