UCT: Protests won't affect exam preparations

On Thursday, three students were arrested as about 200 protesters disrupted classes and damaged UCT buses.

UCT vice chancellor Max Price (second from right) and his management team at a briefing on 2 November 2017. Picture: Graig-Lee Smith/EWN

CAPE TOWN - Ongoing protests and disruptions at the University of Cape Town (UCT) will not affect preparations for the final exams.

Vice chancellor Max Price on Thursday briefed the media on contingency plans.

On Thursday, three students were arrested as about 200 protesters disrupted classes and damaged UCT buses.

Price says that some of the protesters’ demands are unreasonable.

The students want a zero-fee increase, but Price warns that the university will go bankrupt if they don’t have any increases.

He says that students who are funded through the NFSAS scheme will not have any increases in 2018.

President Jacob Zuma is yet to release the much anticipated Heher report into the feasibility of free higher education.

There is only one week of lectures left and exams are scheduled to start on 15 November.

WITS BEEFS UP SECURITY

Wits University says that all its exams and scheduled activities will go ahead as planned on Friday, following reports of protests by some students at the institution.

The newly elected Students Representative Council (SRC) held a mass meeting on Thursday night to discuss plans of a shutdown where the majority of students were against the protests.

The student body says that despite resolving to let exams go ahead with no disruptions, it is aware of some students that have been encouraging disruptions for their own interests.

The university is calm this morning, with some students arriving to write their exams.

A police van is stationed near the Great Hall and campus security has been patrolling the premises.

Wits University’s Shirona Patel says that they have brought additional security as a precautionary measure.

The university has warned that appropriate action will be taken against anyone found violating the rights of others or contravening the institution's code of conduct.