Scopa wants KPMG to account in Parly

Scopa says it wants the company to clarify reports on its behaviour and explain the withdrawal of its report into the revenue service.

FILE: Scopa chairperson Themba Godi. Picture: GCIS.

CAPE TOWN - Auditing firm KPMG will have to defend itself before Parliament's Standing Committee on Public Accounts (Scopa) if it wants to continue doing business with government departments and state-owned enterprises.

This follows revelations last week that the company ignored questionable business practices by its client, the Gupta family.

Scopa says it wants the company to clarify reports on its behaviour and explain the withdrawal of its report into the revenue service.

Scopa says KPMG's unexplained retraction of its Sars report raises questions about its integrity.

Chairperson Themba Godi says the committee also has questions about the company's work for Treasury on the Integrated Financial Management System project.

“Their issues with Sars are theirs to sort out. But we are merely looking at the fact that they are doing work for the government in various ways.”

He says Scopa will not hesitate to call on government to stop using the services of certain auditing firms if they are found to be unethical.