City of CT: Gang violence reason for CT branded ‘murder capital’ of SA

The "Mother City" is South Africa's capital of violent crime. The report was authored Urban Safety Reference group.

FILE: The Gang and Drugs Task Team patrols the streets of Manenberg. Known for its gang violence, Manenberg is home to a new tech which is attempting to curb gun violence. Picture: Anthony Molyneaux/EWN

CAPE TOWN - Cape Town may consistently make the list of the world's most desirable cities, but a report released on Wednesday reveals its dark side.

The "Mother City" is South Africa's capital of violent crime. The report was authored Urban Safety Reference group.

It assesses the state of safety in the nation's cities. Cape Town is rated as the murder capital of the country.

It's number one in both violent and non-violent property crimes. It ranks first in robberies.

It's now even starting to emerge as a carjacking hotspot moving to the fourth worst city for those crimes.

It's no surprise that Capetonians are citizens who are most fearful of crime.

The report attributes the levels of violent crime to, among other things, easy access to alcohol, drugs and firearms.

GANG VIOLENCE AS CAUSE

Gang violence is the reason Cape Town is being branded the murder capital of South Africa.

That's according to mayoral committee member JP Smith who was commenting on a report by the Urban Safety Reference group which assesses the state of safety in cities.

The City of Cape Town's JP Smith says gang violence “disproportionately” contributes to the Metro's high rate of violent crime.

“If you pull the gang statistics or the gang murders out of the equation we drop out of the race for violent crime immediately.”

Community Safety MEC Dan Plato says they depend a lot on police to combat the issue.

“Dealing with guns and drugs driven by hardcore criminal, by hardcore gang bosses and circumventing each and every legal process in the country, you need specialised people to deal with that. They did away with specialisation.”

Smith and Plato have criticised police efforts to address gangsterism, highlighting a lacklustre conviction rate and corrupt officials working with the gangs.

(Edited by Zinhle Nkosi)