Rise and shine: SA penis transplant recipient 'doing well'

In a recent article run in online medical journal, 'The Lancet', Van der Merwe states the transplant has restored man’s 'normal physiological functions'.

The Stellenbosch University medical team performing a penis transplant. Picture: Stellenbosch University.

CAPE TOWN – Two years after receiving the world’s first successful penile transplant, a South African man is leading a normal life and is doing well.

Stellenbosch University Professor Andre van der Merwe and his team performed the groundbreaking operation at Tygerberg Hospital in 2014.

In a recent article run in an online medical journal, The Lancet, Van Der Merwe states the transplant has restored man’s “normal physiological functions”.

Van der Merwe says the psycho-sociological effects of losing a penis are devastating.

The recipient’s penis had to be amputated after a botched traditional circumcision.

Now the 24-year-old man once again has a fully functioning appendage.

Van der Merwe writes that within three months of the surgery, the recipient was having regular sexual intercourse.

He adds that two years following the operation, the man’s urine flow rate and erectile function are normal.