David Makhura: SA needs ethical leadership

The Gauteng Premier says South Africa needs leadership that is decisive against corruption and won’t have friends that are engaged in looting.

Gauteng Premier David Makhura speaking at the Gauteng Infrastructure Investment Conference in Midrand on 27 July. Picture: Twitter/@GautengProvince.

JOHANNESBURG - Gauteng Premier David Makhura says South Africa needs leadership that is decisive against corruption and won’t have friends that are engaged in looting.

Makhura was speaking at the Gauteng Infrastructure Investment Conference on Thursday.

Makhura says that for South Africa to succeed it needs ethical leadership that is committed to solving economic and social problems.

“We need leadership that would be very decisive in sending a message that corruption is not allowed in the country. Let alone having friends who’ll be there essentially to come and loot.”

Makhura says he believes South Africa will bounce back after the African National Congress (ANC)’s leadership contest in December.

Makhura says South Africa will not be in this position for ever.

“South Africa’s potential cannot be undermined by moments like this one. I’m confident we’ll bounce back.”

And he knows what kind of leadership the country needs.

“So, we need that leadership that’s ethical. A leadership that is committed to making South Africa. We have too many unemployed people and too many social problems.”

Makhura and the Gauteng ANC have been seen as critics of President Jacob Zuma and called for him to resign after the Nkandla scandal.

They’re also expected to back Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa in the ANC’s December leadership contest.

WATCH: Makhura at the Gauteng Infrastructure Investment Conference

MAKHURA PRAISES CIVIL SOCIETY GROUPS

Makhura says he’s pleased that civil society groups have been standing up and criticising what is happening in South Africa.

He also says that these groups must continue to put pressure on the government in the future.

Makhura says civil society groups have been doing the right thing by putting government’s leadership under pressure.

“I’m happy that civil society groups are more active. people are standing up and saying 'this can’t be happening in our name… this can’t happen in our country'. This must not stop, it must be something that we build on.”

And he says they must keep up the pressure even if the current situation eases.

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)