Pathologist: Martin van Breda’s fatal blow likely from behind

During the pathologist’s testimony, there were times when Henri van Breda cried, held his head in his hands and generally kept his head down.

Henri van Breda shifted to the back of the stand to avoid seeing photos of his family’s bloodied bodies. Picture: Monique Mortlock/EWN

CAPE TOWN - A pathologist has told the Western Cape High Court that Martin van Breda had no defensive injuries and the blow that killed him most likely came from behind.

The pathologist is testifying in the Henri van Breda murder trial.

He is accused of killing his parents, Martin and Teresa as well as his older brother Rudi, and severely wounding his sister Marli.

Henri van Breda shifted to the back of the stand to avoid seeing photos of his family’s bloodied bodies.

During the pathologist’s testimony, there were times when Van Breda cried, held his head in his hands and generally kept his head down.

Dr Daphne Anthony conducted the post-mortem examinations on the three deceased.

She has concluded that they all died due to head injuries, says all three died due to head injuries and the causes thereof.

Anthony says Rudi van Breda had a defensive wound on his left pinkie finger, which indicates he tried to block the force to his head.

She says Teresa van Breda also had defensive wounds on her right thumb, suggesting she too tried to ward off the attack.

Anthony says Martin van Breda, however, had no defensive wounds, and that this, coupled with his head injuries, suggests he could have been caught unaware by the attack and hit from behind.

Anthony says it took strength and considerable force for these types of wounds to be inflicted.

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)