Queen condemns ‘barbaric’ deadly Manchester attack

The aftermath of the Manchester bombing has seen global outrage, calls for unity, an arrest as news that one of the victims was eight years old.

Police forensic officers walk along a bridge linking Victoria station to the Manchester Arena, the scene of a terror attack during a pop concert by US star Ariana Grande in Manchester, north-west England on 23 May 2017. Picture: AFP.

LONDON - The aftermath of the Manchester bombing has seen global outrage, calls for unity, an arrest and news that one of the victims was an eight-year-old girl.

On Monday night, a suicide bomber killed 22 people and injured nearly 60 others, including 12 children at the Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility while security has been bolstered in London.

Britain’s deadliest terror attack in over a decade has been met with fierce condemnation.

President Donald Trump blasted the “evil losers” behind the deadly attack: “This was an evil act… so many young and beautiful innocent people murdered by evil losers.”

British Prime Minister Theresa May said: “We struggle to comprehend the twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage.”

Queen Elizabeth has called the attack “barbaric”.

Britain’s top police officer describes it as “appalling”, while M15 and London Mayor Sadiq Khan have used words like “sickening” and “revolting”.

A 23-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the bombing.

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)