Glenda Gray: Science saves lives

The SA doctor, who's been listed among Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world, says there needs to be continued support for science.

FILE: Professor Glenda Gray. Picture: mrc.co.za.

JOHANNESBURG - South African medical research pioneer professor Glenda Gray, who's been listed among Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world, says there needs to be continued support for science because it saves lives.

She is being honoured for her contribution in leading a team of researchers who carried out the first HIV vaccine efficacy trial in seven years.

Gray, who is currently the president and CEO of the South African Medical Research Council, says this means South African science is recognised internationally and that people should invest more in science.

“Science is important and science that happens in South Africa is important. It means that HIV I still recognised as a global problem and people who commit themselves to finding an HIV vaccine catch the imagination of the world and Time.”

(Edited by Zamangwane Shange)