Opposition: Zuma no confidence motion will be different

The opposition parties say they are using all means possible, including the courts, to have Parliament reopen for a special sitting to table the motion.

Opposition parties briefing the media after meeting on 3 April 2017 about the motion of no confidence in President Zuma. Picture: Masa Kekana/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG – Opposition parties say their efforts to have a motion of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma will be different this time around.

The Economic Freedom Fighters, Democratic Alliance, United Democratic Movement (UDM), Congress of the People, African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP), Inkatha Freedom Party and other opposition parties met in Johannesburg on Monday to formulate a plan in an attempt to have Zuma removed.

The parties say they are using all means possible, including the courts, to have Parliament reopen for a special sitting to table the motion.

ACDP leader Kenneth Moshoe says they believe that this time the motion of no confidence in Zuma will be different to the previous unsuccessful attempt.

“When the other motion of no confidence failed, we were not facing the crisis that we’re facing currently and also we didn’t have as much intense lobbying as is taking place right now. It’s not only members of the opposition that acknowledge that we’ve a crisis but even members of the ruling party.”

UDM leader Bantu Holomisa said they did not discuss the names of the ANC Members of Parliament who they could sway to vote with them but the recent outcry from senior ANC officials should give some kind of an idea.

Holomisa adds that those who have been speaking out should not be hypocritical and put the country first.

Some parties have turned to the courts, while others have filed a motion of no confidence in Zuma.

The EFF’s Dali Mpofu said: “Whether it’s the vote of no confidence, whether it’s this or the court action, our aim is to galvanise society to say that enough is enough.”

At the same time, DA leader Mmusi Maimane, agreeing with Mpofu, said this is not an anti-African National Congress (ANC) agenda but anti-Zuma.

“Nobody is calling for the regime change. We’re very clear that we want somebody that will uphold the Constitution, will ensure that they govern for the interest of the people of South Africa, that’s the suitability criteria.

“And therefore, subsequent to that, I’m sure consultations will take place and nomination will be put forward.”

The IFP’s Albert Mncwango said: “The fact that this debate is not an academic exercise, we can never be wrong because we’re dead serious about the crisis that the country finds itself in.”

(Edited by Leeto M Khoza)