20°C / 22°C
  • Tue
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 31°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 33°C
  • 19°C
  • Sun
  • 34°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 35°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 36°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 34°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 34°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 36°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 18°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 19°C
  • Sun
  • 26°C
  • 20°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 27°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 18°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 25°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 24°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 34°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 34°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 36°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 37°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 33°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 34°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 35°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 28°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 28°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 34°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 37°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 13°C

Prince Charles visits earthquake-hit Italian town

Prince Charles walked through the so-called red zone of the hill town of Amatrice and also laid flowers on top of a simple rock used as memorial to the victims.

A man stands among damaged buildings after a strong earthquake hit central Italy, in Amatrice on August 24, 2016. Picture: AFP

AMATRICE – Britain's Prince Charles paid a visit on Sunday to one of the towns in central Italy devastated by a major earthquake last August, a day after locals protested against the government because of aid delays.

The 6.2 magnitude earthquake killed nearly 300 people and destroyed thousands of homes and businesses.

More than 45,000 aftershocks have rattled the region, including an even stronger 6.6 magnitude quake in October, the biggest to strike Italy for 36 years.

The heir to the British throne walked through the so-called red zone of the hill town of Amatrice, one of the hardest-hit areas, surrounded by rubble and collapsed buildings. He also visited temporary homes and a newly-built school.

"I hope you will not have to stay in this situation for long," the prince was reported to have said to the families living in small prefabricated homes on the edges of the town.

Prince Charles also laid flowers on top of a simple rock used as memorial to the victims and ate Amatriciana pasta, a famous local dish.

Citizens from the central Italian regions devastated by tremors staged protests on Saturday outside parliament in Rome and in smaller Italian cities.

They called on the national government to speed up reconstruction efforts, simplify rules for building new homes and apply tax breaks to residents of quake-hit regions.

They also threatened to block the main highway connecting Rome to the central regions of the country if the government did not schedule negotiations with them within a week.

Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni responded that reconstruction was an absolute priority for the government.

The visit to Amatrice was part of a six-day visit to Italy by Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall. They are scheduled to meet Pope Francis at the Vatican on Tuesday.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus