Aarto: Companies may be charged for driver infringements

Parliament's transport portfolio committee has Tuesday been reviewing submissions made on proposed amendments to the traffic offences law.

FILE: Gauteng traffic police officers are stopping motorists during roadblocks. Picture: EWN.

JOHANNESBURG – The Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) says vehicle operators, like bus and taxi companies, must be held liable for the poor condition of vehicles involved in traffic infringements.

Parliament's transport portfolio committee has Tuesday been reviewing submissions made on proposed amendments to the traffic offences law.

The road agency says it will be unfair to only target drivers under the new law.

Parliament's portfolio committee on transport is grappling with a range of issue emanating from proposed amendments to the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences (Aarto) Act, including the proposed demerit system and the tribunal.

At issue is who will be held responsible for an infringement caused in a vehicle that does not belong to the driver.

The RTIA’s Thabo Tsholetsane says operators must shoulder some of the blame.

“You can’t just leave the driver and leave the company. Those companies will be punished for what we call operator infringements.”

The committee must also decide what to do about drivers who can't afford to pay fines.

Tsholetsane says he does not believe they should be let off the hook.

(Edited by Masechaba Sefularo)