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New findings made by SA researchers in Antarctica

Researchers who returned from a recent expedition to Antarctica say they are closer to learning more about climate change.

FILE: A frozen section of the Ross Sea at the Scott Base in Antarctica. Picture: AFP.

CAPE TOWN - Researchers who returned from a recent expedition to Antarctica say they are closer to learning more about climate change.

The crew made the long trip back from the frozen continent on the SA Agulhas II following a two and a half month research expedition.

Researchers made several new findings, such as noting Emperor Penguins foraging further than has yet been recorded, and the fact that this summer has been the second warmest in Antarctica in the past decade.

Chief scientist Ian Meiklejohn, who studied land forms, says it's still too soon to make any conclusions about these observations.

“If we carry on monitoring for a long time, we’ll be able to determine what trends there are in the climate and how different life forms are evolving in Antarctica.”

Cosmic ray engineer David Malan, who ensured all the instruments worked, says the adverse weather condition was one of the biggest challenges the crew faced.

The scientific findings from the expedition will be analysed and fed into an international monitoring network that does critical research on climate change.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)

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