'Phiyega should have foreseen catastrophic consequences of Marikana'

The Claassen report says 34 miners might not have died if Phiyega had paid attention to details of the police’s plan to act.

FILE: Suspended National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega. Picture: Reinart Toerien/EWN.

CAPE TOWN - Suspended National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega should have foreseen the tragic and catastrophic consequences of the decision to act against protesting mineworkers during the Marikana strike.

This is one of the findings of the Claassen Board of Inquiry, set up after police shot and killed 34 miners in August 2012.

The report of the inquiry says Phiyega should be sacked.

The report was voted to be declassified on Thursday by Parliament's police portfolio committee.

The Claassen report says 34 miners might not have died at Marikana if Phiyega had paid attention to details of the police’s plan to act against them.

The inquiry found Phiyega to be an unsatisfactory witness, saying she was “ambivalent and contradictory” on whether the plan hatched at a top-level meeting was discussed.

The report says Phiyega tried to avoid taking responsibility for the bloodshed that resulted and that she tried to hide the fact that there were two different shooting scenes at Marikana.

The report says this was serious misconduct and a breach of her duty to manage the police in an open and transparent manner.

Phiyega indicated last week that she would be taking the report on review.

(Edited by Shimoney Regter)