Moseneke: Mandela was no sell-out, but ’94 left much unaddressed

Dikgang Moseneke says it is not true that Nelson Mandela was a sell-out, but does agree that 1994 did not address all issues affecting the country.

Retired Constitutional Court judges Dikgang Moseneke and Albie Sachs set to speak at Apartheid Museum. Picture: Katleho Sekhotho/EWN

JOHANNESBURG – Speaking at a book launch at the Apartheid Museum, retired judges Dikgang Moseneke and Albie Sachs have addressed challenges affecting South Africa’s judicial system; ranging from land reform, whether former President Nelson Mandela was a sell-out and many other topics since 1994.

Close to 100 people have gathered to hear the judges speak at the museum in Ormonde, south of Johannesburg.

The event, which is hosted by the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation, is also dedicated to the life of late African National Congress President Oliver Reginald Tambo.

The retired pair touched on various topics, including the challenge of land equity.

Moseneke says one of the first things to look at is how much land the state owns.

“Are the provision adequate? No. Are they useful though to be able to produce land equity? Yes. ”

While Sachs says the question of just and equitable compensation of land has still not gone to the courts.

“We fought over every word in that. There is no right to property in the 1996 Constitution, the only right is not to be arbitrarily deprived of property.”

Dikgang Moseneke says it is not true that Nelson Mandela was a sell-out, but does agree that 1994 did not address all issues affecting the country.

(Edited by Masechaba Sefularo)