Clock ticking for Phiyega as Zuma mulls her fate

Phiyega has until next week to submit further representations to President Jacob Zuma about her fitness to hold office.

FILE: Suspended National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega listens to representation by Advocate Dali Mpofu during closing arguments at the inquiry into her fitness to hold office in Centurion on 1 June 2016. Picture: Reinart Toerien/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG – Suspended National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega has until next week to submit further representations to President Jacob Zuma about her fitness to hold office.

The Claasen Board of Inquiry held public hearings last year to investigate Phiyega’s conduct during the Marikana massacre in 2012.

The inquiry has reportedly found that she is not fit to hold office, was not a satisfactory witness, and showed a distinct lack of understanding of the importance of her position.

The Farlam Inquiry implicated Phiyega and other senior police officials in the deaths of 34 miners.

The suspended police chief who has been on paid suspension since October 2015 has maintained that she did not mislead the inquiry and that police cannot take all the blame for the deaths in Marikana.

The violent protest at the platinum mine made international headlines almost five years ago and government has only recently announced that it is ready to compensate the families of the victims.

The Claasen Board of Inquiry has reportedly found that Phiyega tried to avoid taking responsibility for the conduct of the police in Marikana, also saying she is not fit and proper to hold the position of national police commissioner, and should be dismissed.

Zuma is still studying the report but has given Phiyega the opportunity to submit further written representations, before he decides her fate.

It’s understood that the suspended national police commissioner will challenge the findings and is still attempting to have the Farlam Commission’s findings set aside by a court.”

(Edited by Masechaba Sefularo)