Commission rules out legal action against Doom pastor

The CRL says until a regulatory body is established for churches in SA, there is little that can be done against pastors using unconventional and harmful methods of healing.

FILE: Prophet Lethebo Rabalago of the Mount Zion General Assembly Church insists the use of Doom is a healing method that can cure people suffering from various illnesses. Picture: Facebook.

JOHANNESBURG - The Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Lingusuitic Communities (CRL) says until a regulatory body is established for churches in South Africa, there is little that can be done to ensure that pastors using unconventional and harmful methods of healing can be held accountable.

Over the weekend a Limpopo pastor was photographed spraying insect killer over members of his congregation.

Prophet Lethebo Rabalago of the Mount Zion General Assembly Church insists the use of Doom is a healing method that can cure people suffering from various illnesses.

The CRL Rights Commission chairperson Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva says in most instances the people who consume these harmful substances are consenting adults, which rules out the possibility of legal action.

“When they do this to adults, there is no law in the country that can stop them.”

Mkhwanazi-Xaluva says it is important that the religious sector be formalised to avoid such incidents.

“We need to pass the regulations and legislations that we are proposing and that we believe can protect communities and congregants.”

The commission chairperson stresses the importance of legislation to be created in order to protect vulnerable people from being victims of harmful religious practices.

(Edited by Winnie Theletsane)