SACP: Zuma cost ANC votes in municipal polls

The SACP also says there is a climate of extreme recklessness in parts of the ANC, parts of government and across many state-owned entities.

FILE: ANC president Jacob Zuma. Picture: Vumani Mkhize/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - The South African Communist Party (SACP) says it’s clear that the decision by the African National Congress (ANC) to make President Jacob Zuma the face of its election campaign cost the party many votes and that opinion polls show his approval rating is much lower than the party’s approval rating.

It also says there is a climate of extreme recklessness in parts of the ANC, in parts of government and across many state-owned entities.

In a discussion document prepared by the SACP’s central committee, the party says opinion polls show President Zuma’s approval rating is under 30%, much lower than that of the ANC.

It then asks where else in the world would a political party choose to build its campaign around a deeply flawed personality cult.

The SACP also says the movement hasn’t seen such visible signs of division since 2007, the year the ANC held its
Polokwane conference.

It also says there is the willful bypassing of ANC and Cabinet mandated positions on issues like the SABC, SAA, digital terrestrial television and nuclear energy.

The party also says that while ANC conferences and alliance summits have all recognised the problems of factionalism, corruption and social distance the ANC’s national, provincial and regional leaderships have shown very little willingness to deal decisively with these problems.

It then uses Mineral Resources Minister Mosebenzi Zwane’s claim about a banking inquiry as an example.

The SACP also says ANC treasurer Zweli Mkhize has said that the party spent around R350 million on its election campaign.

But it says that figure does not include money given to individual ANC leaders, some of which may have disappeared into private pockets.

During the election campaign, the ANC’s campaigns head Nomvula Mokonyane had said the party was spending R1 billion.

(Edited by Winnie Theletsane)