Moscow: Russian, Syrian planes have not bombed Aleppo for a week

Six humanitarian corridors in eastern Aleppo have been opened to allow civilians to flee the city.

Syrians walk over rubble following air strikes on the rebel-held Fardous neighbourhood of the northern embattled Syrian city of Aleppo on 12 October 2016. Picture: AFP.

BRUSSELS - Russian and Syrian military planes have not bombed militants in Aleppo for the last seven days or even flown over the devastated city, the Russian Defence Ministry said in statement on Tuesday.

It said six humanitarian corridors in eastern Aleppo which have been opened to allow civilians to flee were still operating and that 48 women and children had left the city late on Monday.

Meanwhile, an investigation has found Syrian refugee children have been working in factories in Turkey making clothes for British high street retailer Marks & Spencer and online store ASOS.

BBC journalists took photographs of Marks & Spencer labels in the factories. Some Syrian refugees worked 12-hour days in a factory distressing jeans for fashion brands Mango and Zara, using chemicals with inadequate protection, the BBC said.

An M&S spokesperson said: "We had previously found no evidence of Syrian workers employed in factories that supply us, so we were very disappointed by these findings, which are extremely serious and are unacceptable to M&S."

M&S said it was working with the Turkish supplier to offer permanent legal employment to any Syrian daily workers employed in the factory.

"Mango has zero tolerance towards the practices described in the Panorama program," a Mango spokesperson said.

The company said it had instructed an urgent and unannounced audit of the concerned facilities after the BBC's notification. "Under no circumstances was the use of child labour of Syrian workers detected," she said.

An ASOS spokeswoman said: "It's a subject we take incredibly seriously. But it would be wrong for us to comment on reporting we haven't seen."

Turkey has been a main entrypoint for refugees from the ongoing conflict in Syria, with three million estimated to be living there. Ankara in March signed a deal with the EU to stem the flow of refugees into the bloc.

A Reuters investigation this year also found evidence of Syrian refugee children in Turkey working in clothes factories in illegal conditions.