Malema served with summons

Julius Malema held a media briefing at the EFF's headquarters in Braamfontein this afternoon.

EFF leaders Julius Malema addresses the media at a press conference at the party’s head office in Johannesburg on 13 October 2016. Picture: Reinart Toerien/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) leader Julius Malema has been issued with a summons for an offence allegedly committed in 2014 at the University of the Free State (UFS).





Malema held a media briefing at the EFF's headquarters in Braamfontein this afternoon.

He gave input on a range of challenges from the Fees Must Fall protests to the charges against Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan.

He has called for the National Prosecuting Authority head Shaun Abrahams to step down, calling him a joke.

The EFF leader held no punches criticising the latest events in the political sphere, saying South Africa has been reduced to a banana republic by the African National Congress.

However, as he was addressing members of the media, Malema was notified that the police were at the EFF's headquarters to issue a summons for him.

[WATCH]: Malema on summons: The state has met its match



Malema says the sudden summons he has been issued with is a desperate attempt by the state to silence him and his party.

The EFF's Commander in Chief says, "All those who are seen to be opponents, an alternative voice must be suppressed through state institutions."

The charges state that Malema incited violence in 2014 when he incited his supporters to commit land grabs.

This is what Malema said then, "If you see a piece of land and you like it, don't apologise, go and occupy that land. That land belongs to us."

Malema says he is not shaken by the summons.

"But with me they've met their match. I'm not scared of anything so I will receive those summons and hear what they say. It's our lives; all types of threats, shenanigans and all types of summons we get."

According to the summons, Malema contravened two acts the Riotous Assemblies Act and the Trespass Act near Mangaung in Bloemfontein in 2014 and in New Castle in KwaZulu-Natal in June this year.