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UCT hopes for compromise on tuition fee increase

The university says an 8% fee increase is desperately needed for the institution to stay afloat next year.

FILE: UCT vice chancellor Max Price sits amongst students outside Jameson Hall on 22 October 2015. Picture: Abed Ahmed/EWN.

CAPE TOWN - The University of Cape Town (UCT) has suggested a compromise to try and address tertiary education funding woes.

An inquiry is looking into the feasibility of free higher education. UCT will make its submission to the inquiry next week.

Meanwhile, student protests again erupted at some campuses this month.

UCT says an eight percent fee increase is desperately needed for the institution to stay afloat next year.

Vice chancellor Max Price says this is to cover an increased wage bill because of insourcing, as well as a hike in the price of imported goods, such as electronics and laboratory items due to a weaker currency.

While the institution would prefer government to carry the financial burden, Price admits this won't be viable.

The institution has suggested a tuition fee increase in real terms for students from families with an annual income of R500,000.

This compromise, says Price, will decrease the additional funding needed from government.

He warns, however, without government support, he sees no way of proceeding without an inflation adjustment to fees.

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